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20121101
20121130
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 76 (some duplicates have been removed)
. this is not the election outcome that wall street wanted to see. after all many investors believe president obama's tax policies will hurt corporate profits. on top of that there's the likelihood of more regulation in the president's second term. those concerns were evident in selling today of energy, banking and healthcare stocks. a quick look at the price board at the new york stock exchange is a good barometer for the worrywarts out there. wall street veteran teddy weissberg says many investors are just plain upset. >> there was an expectation that we would have some change and a change in the policies. and, i think with obama getting re-elected there are a lot of folks that are not happy, and we're kind of seeing that in the stock market. >> reporter: but, others say it's not just the disappointment of romney's loss, it's that the fiscal cliff now looms large on wall street. >> i think the big issue right now is the fiscal cliff, now that the election is behind us everyone is really focusing on what's going to happen at the end of this year, and of course if nothing's done by the end of the year th
, the nasdaq rose 12, and the s&p added 11 pois. polls show that president obama and governor romney are in a tight race. ultimately, voters in a few key states will have the final say on who wins the white house. florida is one of those important battleground states. tom is in miami with more. tom. >> tom: susie, florida is the biggest swing state prize with the most electoral votes up for grabs. the economy, healthcare and immigration all are on display re wh flida'diverse and growing population. voters in south florida today packed their umbrellas for the hot sun, and patience in some precincts. it's been a tight race in the sunshine state. compared to four years ago, it was a harder time deciding whom to vote for, for her. >> this time it came to the nitty gritty, they were fighting about real things, jobs, health care and i think they both have very good points. >> reporter: for her the decision came down to health care and medical insurance coverage, supporting president obama's effort to reform the industry. but natalie felt differently. >> there's a lot of changes in health c
on friday between president obama and congressional leaders. they will be talking about ways to solve the so-called "fiscal cliff" dilemma. investors appear cautious about making any big moves until they know whether the cliff will trigger increases in capital gains and dividend taxes. the dow fell almost 59 points, the nasdaq lost 20, and the s&p was down five. meanwhile, in washington, congress returned to work for the first time since september. lawmakers face a long "to-do list," and getting a deal on that fiscal cliff is right at the top. darren gersh reports. >> reporter: it was freshman welcome day in washington. senate republican leader mitch mcconnell lost ground in the election, but he posed for the cameras with the three new senators who will be joining his side of the aisle in january. in the house, minority leader nancy pelosi beamed as she presented the new faces adding to democratic ranks in the coming congress. given what awaits these new lawmakers in january, you might wonder why they want the job. it's still not clear whether a lame duck session of congress will navigate th
news. >> reporter: on the other hand, corpina doesn't think the re- election of president obama will trigger a selloff. more likely he would expect to see status quo for stocks. >> i think people have bought into the fact that the market is going to take a long time to recover, our economy is going to take a long time to recover and the market has seemed to stay on the track so to speak. >> reporter: of course there is also the possibility however remote, that it might take days before we know who will occupy the oval office. that's a scary flash back to the hanging chad debacle of the 2000 election. >> i think the odds are against it. i shudder to think. but, you remember how bad it was back in 2000. it was crazy, it drove people crazy, it drove the market crazy. i don't think that happens. i think one of these guys wins handily. >> reporter: and, then there are those who believe the stock market will rally no matter who wins tomorrow. that's because at least some uncertainty will finally be removed from the market. suzanne pratt, "n.b.r.," new york. >> susie: joining us now fo
obama, we had taken a defensive stance already. we had gone slightly underweight equities, and added more things like high-yield mortgage debt, emerging market debt, and mortgage-backed securities, that will yield as much as capital appreciation, and investments that have lower volatility than the stock market. so we have an overweight there. those investments i just spoke about, that's about 24% of our portfolio right now, and that's definitely helped us get through the last few weeks without giving up much of our gains. >> susie: tell us a little bit about -- well, you are on the buying side with equities, what are you buying? are you in u.s. stocks? international stocks? what is the mix? >> sure. one of the interesting things i think over the last few months, and maybe this isn't putting it very elegantly, but i like to think about it as revenge of the global investor. for all of 2011, and the start of 2012, we saw the s&p as one of the world's leading stock markets. and a lot of investors said, why don't i just own u.s. stocks and why bother with this global investing stuff. but
it was when obama was sworn in. now the obama administration is pointing out they created more than five million jobs since the president took office in the private sector, that is. and also, if you look a the first full month the president was in office the unemployment rate was 8.3%. now it's 7.9. >> tom: instead of arguing about the data, what about the demographics here? because polls, obviously, show this is an extremely close race going into tuesday. so what about the key voting demographics in this jobs report? >> reporter: you know, one little nugget that i thought was very interesting, the unemployment rate for white men has fall tone 6.6% and about a year ago it was 7.8%. that is a key voting demographic, but inrestingly enough, even though the unemployment rate is coming down, that demographic is going as much as two to one for romney. you know, sometimes demographic information and the unemployment information doesn't always sync up. >> tom: timing is everything in terms of synching up for whoever wins next week and what party is in control of alcohol because they'll seemingl
: that and more tonight on n.b.r.! >> susie: so far so good on the fiscal cliff. president obama and congressional leaders got off to a good start in their first round of negotiations. the president met with congressional leaders who emerged later to say they want to move quickly to prevent automatic spending cuts and tax increases from tanking the economy at the first of the year. but as darren gersh reports, what we are not yet clear about is whether either side is willing to give up enough to get the job done. >> reporter: in washington, they think carefully about the pictures they want to present to the public so this mattered. all four congressional leaders-- democrats and republicans-- after meeting with the president chose to face the cameras together. that hardly ever happens and it reflects the new post-election mood of cooperation. house speaker john boehner called the meeting very constructive. >> i outlined a framework that deals with reforming our tax code and reforming our spending. and i believe the framework that i've outlined in our meeting today is consistent with the president's
for president obama's health care insurance reform. it's the day states across the country must decide if they will be setting up their own health insurance exchanges, or if they will opt out and let the government do it for them. sylvia hall takes a look at the exchanges, how they'll work, and how they will impact the way americans pay for care. >> reporter: the idea behind state health insurance exchanges is pretty simple-- the uninsured will have a central place to shop for health insurance. all plans will meet minimum coverage requirements and no one is turned down. in exchange, health insurance companies get more healthy customers, costing them less, because virtually everyone is required to buy health insurance. for those who can't afford it, the federal government provides subsidies. >> it's a little bit of a grand bargain that's been struck with the insurance industry-- you stop doing some of that cherry- picking behavior that's been so problematic, and in return, we'll guarantee you that there will be a steady stream of customers who will be buying their product. and they'll b
. >> reporter: during the campaign season, president obama visited college campuses, with a big goal. he wants to cut the growth of tuition prices in half over the next decade. to do it, he'll have to curb a steady upward trend that spans over several decades. just this year, in-state tuition for public colleges is up by almost 5%. for two-year colleges, in-state tuition jumped almost 6%. the average sticker price for private colleges this year is up by about 4% from last year. the predent has proposed controlling tuition growth by expanding a few federal programs like some student loans and work study programs, but reducing those funds for colleges and universities that raise tuition too much and too fast. >> right now the federal government, just this past year, gave out $187 billion in federal financial aid and for the most part that was without strings attached to it and the president is proposing to take a small percentage of those dollars and try to leverage them to go to schools that provide good value for students. >> reporter: but this proposal wouldn't affect most federal education d
>> this is n.b.r. >> tom: good evening. i'm tom hudson. president obama says he's open to new ideas, on raising government revenues, but eliminating tax deductions for the rich doesn't go far enough. >> susie: i'm susie gharib. stocks slide to four-month lows, on worries that a fiscal cliff deal is a still a long way off. >> tom: and with a national health care insurance overhaul underway, a company's share of health insurance has risen at its smallest pace in a decade. >> susie: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> tom: with 47 days left for president obama and congress to agree on avoiding a combination of higher taxes and government spending cuts, the president today said he won't extend tax cuts for people who don't need them. that hard line came during a white house press conference just as a negotiations with republican leaders get underway to avoid the fiscal cliff. as darren gersh reports from washington, even before republicans and democrats sit down to talk on friday, both sides are laying down markers. >> reporter: just two days before he meets with congressional leaders
today to persuade president obama and congress to avoid the fiscal cliff. with just 33 days left to nail down a deal, c.e.o.s made the rounds to explain to lawmakers that because of cliff gridlock, they're holding back on hiring and spending. as darren gersh reports, c.e.o.s weren't the only ones campaigning hard today. >> reporter: the president and republicans focused today on staging events designed to pressure the other side. the president called on americans to tweet, facebook and call members of congress to tell them to pass tax cuts for everyone making less that $250,000 a year. >> 97% of small businesses would not see their income tax go up by a single dime. even the wealthiest americans would still get a tax cut on the first $250,000 of their income. >> reporter: the speaker dismissed a call from a fellow republican to give the president what he wants, saying it's not good economics to raise tax rates on small businesses. >> going over the fiscal cliff will hurt our economy and hurt job creation in our country. this is not good for our country. it's as simple as that, and the pr
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 76 (some duplicates have been removed)